180 Attend 2018 Glyphosate-Resistant Palmer amaranth Management Field Day

180 Attend 2018 Glyphosate-Resistant Palmer amaranth Management Field Day Tuesday, August 7, 2018

University of Nebraska–Lincoln Crops Team
Stakeholders learning about control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in soybean.

Palmer amaranth, a member of the pigweed (Amaranthaceae) family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in corn and soybean production fields in Nebraska. Of particular concern is Palmer amaranth resistant to glyphosate in south-central and west-central Nebraska.

The Glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth Management Field Day, organized and led by Amit Jhala, agronomy and horticulture associate professor and extension weed management specialist, was held July 11 near Carleton, Nebraska. A total of 180 attended the field day, including growers, crop consultants, extension educators, graduate students, industry representatives and other clientele.

Aaron Hager, associate professor and extension weed scientist at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, was an invited speaker. He discussed Palmer amaranth identification, biology, and management in corn and soybean.

Amit Jhala speaking at 2018 Field Day
Amit Jhala, agronomy and horticulture associate professor and extension weed management specialist, discusses a project for control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in soybean.

Jhala and team members demonstrated several projects for control of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in soybean and looked at efficacy, crop safety and comparison of new herbicides in the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s unbiased comparison trials. Parminder Chahal, a postdoctoral weed scientist, and Ethann Barnes, agronomy doctoral student, showed a research project on various aspects of Palmer amaranth biology and control in soybean. Stevan Knezevic, agronomy and horticulture professor and extension integrated weed management specialist, presented a project about critical period of Palmer amaranth removal in soybean. Jenny Rees, extension educator, demonstrated how to calculate approximate timing of dicamba injury on soybean by counting number of nodes.

Featured projects were:

  • How row spacing and herbicide programs can affect glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth control in Roundup Ready 2 Xtend Soybean
  • Management of Palmer amaranth in
    • Balance GT/Liberty Link Soybean (resistant to isoxaflutole and glufosinate)
    • Enlist E3 Soybean (resistant to 2,4-D choline, glyphosate, and glufosinate) 
  • Critical period of Palmer amaranth removal affected by residual herbicides in Roundup Ready 2 Xtend Soybean

“The Field Day was a part of the research grant received from Nebraska Soybean Board,” Jhala said. “We thank Jose Henrique, Jasmine Mausbach, Amy Hauver, Adam Striegel, Adam Leise, Sharon Hachtel, Irvin Schelufer, Caleb Wilford, Mike Schlick, Lana Johnson and Wendy Morrissey for their help. A special thanks to the Zion Lutheran Church in Carleton for letting us borrow chairs to accommodate more attendees than expected.”

For more information, contact Amit Jhala at 402-472-1534 or Amit.Jhala@unl.edu.

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