Husker research focuses on atrazine Monday, August 29, 2022
A University of Nebraska–Lincoln project to detect atrazine dissipation and evaluate herbicide programs without atrazine has received a $47,154 grant from the Nebraska Environmental Trust.

See full story in Nebraska Today


Researchers develop guide to fighting redcedar invasion Wednesday, August 24, 2022
 Christine Bielski | Agronomy and Horticulture
A University of Nebraska–Lincoln project to improve efforts against redcedar invasions has received an $81,690 grant from the Nebraska Environmental Trust. Dirac Twidwell, the principal investigator, and Dillon Fogarty, project coordinator, developed that unified vision with the publication of their vulnerability guide, “Reducing woody encroachment in grasslands: A guide for understanding risk and vulnerability.”

See full story in Nebraska Today


Basche to receive ASA Early Career Award Monday, August 22, 2022
Andrea Basche
Andrea Basche, an assistant professor in cropping systems in the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, will be formally presented with the American Society of Agronomy Early Career Award at the ASA Awards Ceremony Nov. 8 during the scientific society’s Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Quick joins department as recruitment specialist Thursday, August 18, 2022
Tyler Quick
Tyler Quick joined the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture July 18 as the new undergraduate recruitment specialist. He has quickly begun work to engage prospective students in plant and landscape systems and plant biology at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

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Grassini appointed to endowed professorship Wednesday, August 17, 2022
Patricio Grassini
University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s Patricio Grassini, associate professor of agronomy and horticulture, has been named the Sunkist Fiesta Bowl Distinguished Professor in Agronomy.

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10 earn graduate degrees Monday, August 15, 2022
August 2022 Department of Agronomy and Horticulture graduates.

The University of Nebraska–Lincoln conferred 632 degrees during a combined graduate and undergraduate commencement ceremony Aug. 13 at Pinnacle Bank Arena, 400 Pinnacle Arena Drive.

Susan M. Swearer, Willa Cather Professor and chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at Nebraska, will deliver the commencement address. Swearer is a licensed psychologist, co-director of the Bullying Research Network and director of the Nebraska Bullying Prevention and Intervention Initiative.

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Kansas, Nebraska researchers use plants to pull toxic lead from soil Monday, August 15, 2022
University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers compared the amount of lead taken up by lettuce planted in highly leaded soil, plain agricultural soil, and soil with biochar and coffee grounds added.
According to a 2020 experiment led by Ryley Thomas, a student under the supervision of Assistant Professor Michael Kaiser in the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, adding biochar to soil reduced the amount of lead taken up by the lettuce planted in it.

Full story from NPR


Omaha Tribe receives $671K grant for hydroponic farming Monday, August 8, 2022
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A first-of-its-kind grant will fund the building of three hydroponic greenhouses on the Omaha reservation.

See full story in Nebraska Today


Tross awarded Corteva Agriscience fellowship Friday, August 5, 2022
Michael Tross
Michael Tross, University of Nebraska–Lincoln doctoral student studying integrated plant biology, is the recipient of the competitive Developing Emerging Leaders and Talent in Agriculture Fellowship from Corteva Agriscience. Tross is advised by James Schnable, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Department of Agronomy and Horticulture professor and the Dr. Charles O. Gardner Professor of Agronomy.

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In Nebraska’s Loess Canyons, Setting Trees Ablaze Gives Prairie Birds a Boost Wednesday, August 3, 2022
A prescribed burn beats back trees in Loess Canyons. Photo: Andy Moore
For generations Great Plains ranchers saw fire as a foe. Now they’re banding together and embracing it as a tool to restore grassland habitat. Liza Grotelueschen and her neighbors began carefully restoring fire to the landscape after seeing the march of woody species displace prairie plants that feed wildlife and livestock alike. “A grassland needs fire as much as it needs water,” says Dirac Twidwell, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln rangeland ecologist. “If you shut off water, it turns into a desert. If you shut off fire, it turns into woodlands.”

See full story in Audubon Magazine